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TVInews - 109 The String Theory, NBS100 and Einstein explore the magic tricks of VoIP - Photo Image665; Drawing
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• 02. Theory of Energy
03. E=mc2
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Photo Image665 - The Criss Angel "MindFreak" Television Show ceremonies at Hollywood's historic Magic Castle, naming Criss Angel as The Academy of Magical Arts' 2005 Magician of the Year. Those honoring Criss Angel included: Gay Blackstone, Milt Larsen, Criss Angel, Irene Larsen, Dale R. Hindman, Troy Cory-Stubblefield, Josie Cory, Costa Sarantakos, Demitra Sarantakos, Joann Sarantakos and George Strumpolis - Photos snaps by Krista Woodley

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1. Feature Story / Do you recognize the voice?
45th Week 2005 / Quantum Theory Physics - Radio and Magic. Scientific Talk Explaining Religion How Physics strings us along.
THERE HAS BEEN much talk of late about the scientific method, which usually takes place in the context of distinguishing science from other "less rational" practices, such as religion and magic. But in recent years science itself has been showing increasingly magical tendencies. In the field of theoretical physics, it is now common practice to talk about other dimensions of reality, entire landscapes of universes for which there is no empirical evidence whatever.
In the latest, hottest Big Science tome -- the delightfully titled "Warped Passages" -- Harvard physicist Lisa Randall describes the idea that the universe we see around us is but one tiny part of a vast reality that may include an infinite number of other universes. Randall is an expert on both cosmology and that arcane branch of particle physics known as string theory. By marrying the two fields, she and her colleagues have formulated a picture in which our universe may be seen as a soap-film-like membrane (a "braneworld") sitting inside a much larger space: the bulk. According to general relativity, the universe we live in has four dimensions: three of space and one of time. Randall's work extends this framework and posits the existence of a fifth dimension. The fifth dimension is the bulk, and within its immeasurably expanded space, there is no reason to assume that ours is the only cosmos.
Evidence for this new dimension is nonexistent. The reason it is being imagined is to resolve a puzzle about gravity: Why is it that when you put a magnet on your fridge door, the magnet sticks to the fridge rather than falling to the floor? How is it that the tiny magnet exerts a bigger force than our whole planet?
Randall's fifth dimension is an attempt to explain why gravitational force is so much weaker than the other forces of nature.
Competing versions of string theory talk about 10 or 11 dimensions, though usually they are tiny. Yet these microscopic dimensions have also become seedbeds for epic ecologies of coexisting universes. String cosmologists routinely write papers about the "populations" of universes that would arise from particular versions of their equations, conjuring into being with a few lines of symbols infinite arrays of other worlds.
IN MANY WAYS, string theorists' extension of the universe is just one more step in a historical chain of cosmic expansions. In the 17th century, the Newtonian revolution expanded our vision by positing that the point-like stars were other material suns with their own planetary systems. A century later, Immanuel Kant suggested that the hazy astronomical blobs known as "nebulae" were each separate galaxies, a notion of immensity so staggering it beggared belief at the time. From one material planet to many; from one star to many; from one galaxy to many; and now, according to string theory, our vision must expand from one space-time to many.
The difference here is that the prior extensions were prompted by observations of distant phenomenon. The extra dimensions of string theory and the other universes they might entail have never been observed and, in principle, they may not be observable, at least not directly. At present they are pure fictions. String theory is so fecund in its descriptive power that one physicist has estimated there may be as many as 10 to the power of 100 different versions of its equations! Each one articulates a different set of possible universes and, at present, there is no way of determining if our universe matches any of them.
Once upon a time, the sine qua non of scientific practice was supposed to be empirical verification. Experimental evidence was the core principle of Francis Bacon's much-vaunted "scientific method." In truth, the picture has always been more complex. Science is also an engine of the imagination, leading our minds beyond the mundane realm of what is to the enchanted regions of what might be.
Nowhere is the speculative dimension of science more prominent than theoretical physics, which has given us such magical possibilities as time machines made from spinning black holes, wormholes that become portals to the far ends of the universe and the "parallel worlds" of quantum mechanics, which, in theory, make every possible version of history a realized physical fact.
The stories that theoretical physicists tell us are written in the language of mathematics, but for all its formal rigor, the science has become in effect a form of speculative literature. Unchained by the fetters of verification, string theorists are free to dream, articulating through their equations vast imagined domains in which almost anything that is mathematically possible is deemed to be happening "somewhere."
As Randall writes in her opening pages: "Physics is far more creative and fun than people generally recognize."
See More Magic Castle Story.
"The whole evening," said Josie, "was a liken to those men and women who work in the field of attempting to define the differences between the wireless telephony and telegraphy of the 20th century. In today's theoretical physics, it is now common practice to talk about other dimensions of reality, entire landscapes of universes for which there is no empirical evidence whatever. FOR MORE STORY ABOUT STRING THEORY
"At least", says Josie, "what you saw disappear in front of your eyes, you got back at the end of the session by the magic practitioner."

Part 02 -- The Theory of Creating Magical Formulas, concepts,
after the original invention.
The more you learn about people, the more reasons you may find not wanting to buy their product, if they even have one with content.
For instance, the biggest problem with "Marconi" is not of his telegraphony dit dah's making, it was his politics. The more we learn about Marconi, the less we like him and, correspondingly, the less we care about his Dit dah radio invention.
Marconi (1874-1937) was truly a ground breaking inventor; one of the first telecommunication winners of the 1909 Nobel Prize for physics, (Karl Ferdinand Braun of Germany, shared the prize), in recognition for their contribution to the development of wireless telegraphy, a feat that few have equaled. Because he knew so many important cultural figures -- he was a close friend of both Mussolini and the Nazi leaders -- his life offers a chance to tell a much grander saga of the times. Mussolini made him president of the Accademia d'Italia. MORE ABOUT Awards and Payola.
Particularly when writing about radio, publishings achieve that larger vision. But Marconi was also a deeply troubled man, as the numerous tales of his 1927 infidelities while married to Beatrice and Countess Bezzi-Scali. Marconi's first marriage to Beatrice O'Brian, daughter of the 14th Baron Inchiquin of Ireland, was annulled after 18 years, the same year he married Countess Bezzi-Scali. History attests to the fact that Marconi joined Mussolini's Fascist Party in Italy, in 1923. He had many fractious relationships and was absent from his post-war duties to his company. MORE ABOUT Awards and Payola.

In the latest, hottest Big Science tome, since Einstein's Theory of Relativity and his catch all mathematical formula for Energy E=mc2 -- "is string theory talk". Before string talking, it was nanotechnology, both of which were sort of explained by the voice of Albert Einstein at the beginning of this voice enhanced Web page. Click here to hear Einstein's Voice once again -- explaining his mathematically concept of what Energy does, when out of nowhere it becomes part of a mass by the click of a finger.

03. Einstein
IN MANY WAYS, Einstein's theory, easier to understand than string theorists explaining the extension of the universe, is just one more step in a historical chain of cosmic expansions. But neither has CONTENT.
Did you hear Einstein's Voice explaining his theory on Energy? The explanation of his 1905 theory was broadcast over the NBS100 radio frequencies in the 1920s.
In the 17th century, the Newtonian revolution expanded our vision by positing that the point-like stars were other material suns with their own planetary systems.
A century later, Immanuel Kant suggested that the hazy astronomical blobs known as "nebulae" were each separate galaxies, a notion of immensity so staggering it beggared belief at the time. From one material planet to many; from one star to many; from one galaxy to many; and now, according to string theory, our vision must expand from one space-time to many. FOR MORE STORY GO TO EINSTEIN IN SOULFIND

It's about 10 or 11 dimensions on top of the fifth dimension we've already heard about. What's inside the delightful book titled, "Warped Passages", authored by Harvard physicist Lisa Randall describes the idea that the universe we see around us is -- but one tiny part of a vast reality that may include an infinite number of other universes.
According to general relativity, says Harvard physicist Lisa Randall, - explains that the universe we live in has four dimensions: three of space and one of time. Randall's work extends this framework and posits the existence of a fifth dimension. The fifth dimension is the bulk, and within its immeasurably expanded space, there is no reason to assume that ours is the only cosmos.
Evidence for this new dimension is nonexistent. The reason it is being imagined is to resolve a puzzle about gravity: Why is it that when you put a magnet on your fridge door, the magnet sticks to the fridge rather than falling to the floor? How is it that the tiny magnet exerts a bigger force than our whole planet?
The difference here is that the prior extensions were prompted by observations of distant phenomenon. The extra dimensions of string theory and the other universes they might entail have never been observed and, in principle, they may not be observable, at least not directly. At present they are pure fictions.
String theory is so fecund in its descriptive power that one physicist has estimated there may be as many as 10 to the power of 100 different versions of its equations! Each one articulates a different set of possible universes and, at present, there is no way of determining if our universe matches any of them.
Once upon a time, the sine qua non of scientific practice was supposed to be empirical verification. Experimental evidence was the core principle of Francis Bacon's much-vaunted "scientific method." In truth, the picture has always been more complex. Science is also an engine of the imagination, leading our minds beyond the mundane realm of what is to the enchanted regions of what might be.
Nowhere is the speculative dimension of science more prominent than theoretical or (concept) physics, which has given us such magical possibilities as time machines made from spinning black holes, wormholes that become portals to the far ends of the universe and the "parallel worlds" of quantum mechanics, which, in theory, make every possible version of history a realized physical fact.
The stories that theoretical physicists tell us -- are most often than not, are written in the language of mathematics, like Eistiens E=mc2, but for all its formal rigor, the science has become in effect a form of speculative literature. Unchained by the fetters of verification, string theorist, or galaxy dream theorists as they would like to call themselves, are free to dream, articulating through their equations vast imagined domains in which almost anything that is mathematically possible is deemed to be happening "somewhere," -- like the broadcasting of radio signals vs. wireless telephne frequencies.
As Randall writes in her opening pages: "Physics is far more creative and fun than people generally recognize."
Randall is an expert on both cosmology and that arcane branch of particle physics known as string theory. By marrying the two fields, she and her colleagues have formulated a picture in which our universe may be seen as a soap-film-like membrane (a "braneworld") sitting inside a much larger space: the bulk.

E=mc2 / "It followed from the special theory of relativity that mass and energy are both but different manifestations of the same thing -- a somewhat unfamiliar conception for the average mind. Furthermore, the equation E is equal to m c-squared, in which energy is put equal to mass, multiplied by the square of the velocity of light, showed that very small amounts of mass may be converted into a very large amount of energy and vice versa.
The mass and energy were in fact equivalent, according to the formula mentioned above. This was demonstrated by Cockcroft and Walton in 1932, experimentally."
In March, and in May, 1905, Einstein sent to the Annalen der Physik, the leading German physics journal, a paper with a new understanding of the structure of light. He argued that light can act as though it consists of discrete, independent particles of energy, in some ways like the particles of a gas.
A few years before, Max Planck's work had contained the first suggestion of a discreteness in energy, but Einstein went far beyond this. His revolutionary proposal seemed to contradict the universally accepted theory that light consists of smoothly oscillating electromagnetic waves. But Einstein showed that light quanta, as he called the particles of energy, could help to explain phenomena being studied by experimental physicists. For example, he made clear how light ejects electrons from metals.
May, 1905, he Annalen der Physik received another paper from Einstein. The well-known kinetic energy theory explained heat as an effect of the ceaseless agitated motion of atoms; Einstein proposed a way to put the theory to a new and crucial experimental test.
If tiny but visible particles were suspended in a liquid, he said, the irregular bombardment by the liquid's invisible atoms should cause the suspended particles to carry out a random jittering dance. Just such a random dance of microscopic particles had long since been observed by biologists (It was called "Brownian motion," an unsolved mystery). Now Einstein had explained the motion in detail. He had reinforced the kinetic theory, and he had created a powerful new tool for studying the movement of atoms.
June 1905 Einstein sent the Annalen der Physik a paper on electromagnetism and motion. Since the time of Galileo and Newton, physicists had known that laboratory measurements of mechanical processes could never show any difference between an apparatus at rest and an apparatus moving at constant speed in a straight line.
Objects behave the same way on a uniformly moving ship as on a ship at the dock; this is called the Principle of Relativity. But according to the electromagnetic theory, developed by Maxwell and refined by Lorentz, light should not obey this principle. Their electromagnetic theory predicted that measurements on the velocity of light would show the effects of motion. Yet no such effect had been detected in any of the ingenious and delicate experiments that physicists had devised: the velocity of light did not vary.
Einstein had long been convinced that the Principle of Relativity must apply to all phenomena, mechanical or not. Now he found a way to show that this principle was compatible with electromagnetic theory after all.
As Einstein later remarked, reconciling these seemingly incompatible ideas required "only" a new and more careful consideration of the concept of time. His new theory, later called the special theory of relativity, was based on a novel analysis of space and time -- an analysis so clear and revealing that it can be understood by beginning science students.
September, 1905 - Einstein reported a remarkable consequence of his special theory of relativity: if a body emits a certain amount of energy, then the mass of that body must decrease by a proportionate amount. Meanwhile he wrote a friend, "The relativity principle in connection with the Maxwell equations demands that the mass is a direct measure for the energy contained in bodies; light transfers mass..
This thought is amusing and infectious, but I cannot possibly know whether the good Lord does not laugh at it and has led me up the garden path." Einstein and many others were soon convinced of its truth. The relationship is expressed as an equation: E=mc?.
This achievement translates into higher advertising rates and all the rest

The creative and the financial are also intrinsically related when it comes to production budgets. Throwing money at projects is not a substitute for creativity. Discipline and innovation are often the complementary sides of the same coin.
Inventive genius can drive phenomenal returns on investment. Look what Chaplin did with a cane and tramp suit, or what Jim Henson did with felt and a ping pong ball. Their materials may have been commonplace, but their visions were uncommon. And, in financial terms, the return on investment on uncommon vision is virtually infinite.
Content from this community My thesis to you is that as long as we allow our incredible tradition of creativity to persist, then the doomsdayers will continue to be proved wrong, as content from this community will be viewed on whatever entertainment hardware is available &endash; whether a digitally projected film on a 5-story Imax screen at CityWalk, or a scratched 16 millimeter print on a bed sheet in Somalia. Unfortunately, this is easier said than done. As they say, the entertainment industry isn't brain surgery.
It's harder. Brain surgery requires an understanding of the intricate physical workings of our brain. Successful entertainment requires an understanding of the emotional jumble of the mind. It is hard to track the electrical connections of a neural synapse. It is even harder to track the emotional connections that result in a laugh or a cry.

4. Bylines

Magic Castle, the Heart of Hollywood
The Magical Paradise for Scientists and VoIP Magicians
FOR MORE STORY ABOUT STRING THEORY

More Articles • Converging News 452005 / TeleCom BuyOuts, Spinoffs and Asset Seizure Boom

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